Full Printable Schedule-at-a-Glance Last updated: 10/02/12

MONDAY—OCTOBER 15

7:00 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks, F. Marc Stewart, MD, Medical Director, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA); and Bernie Elliott, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Complex Medical Conditions and Provider Performance, Optum

8:15 a.m.

Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, Rebecca H. Johnson, MD
Adolescent and young adults are a distinct patient population within oncology, and they have different needs than other cancer patients. Oncology research and clinical agendas are not always designed to focus on the unique biological, clinical, psychosocial, and survivorship issues of the adolescent and young adult. This presentation will address adolescent and young adult cancer care through interdisciplinary research, education, communication, and collaboration among health professionals.

9:00 a.m.

Breast Cancer, Julie R. Gralow, MD
Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Early diagnosis and appropriate selection of therapies is critical to improve outcomes. This presentation will discuss the advances that have been made in our ability to identify patients with predisposing risk factors in order to prevent breast cancer or achieve earlier diagnosis.

10:00 a.m.

Break

10:20 a.m.

CATS at SCCA: The Crohn's Allogeneic Transplant Study, George B. McDonald, MD
While there is no known cure for Crohn's disease (CD), therapies can greatly reduce its signs and symptoms and even bring about long-term remission. Although many people with CD are able to function well, some suffer from severe CD despite the best medical and surgical treatments. This talk will cover this intestinal disorder, its underlying genetics, the rationale for replacing a patient's immune system with that from another person (allogeneic BMT), and an outline of the CATS protocol.

10:50 a.m.

Prostate Cancer Treatment, Evan Y. Yu, MD
Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the United States. This presentation will focus on the rapid new changes that have occurred in the treatment landscape for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

11:50 p.m.

Lunch (provided)

1:00 p.m.

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS), Bart L. Scott, MD
The last decade witnessed the emergence of several therapeutic options for patients with MDS. Therapeutic strategies are tailored based on the disease’s classification, as well as patients’ prognostic risk groups. This presentation will highlight therapies designed to control symptoms due to cytopenias, improve quality of life, and improve the overall survival while preventing or delaying progression to AML.

2:00 p.m.

Review of Phase One Clinical Trials and Studies in Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma, John A. Thompson, MD
Phase 1 clinical trials are the first tests of promising new agents in patients. Phase 1 trials seek to define the side effects and safe-dosing range of the new agents, to explore the amount of the agent in blood and tissue, and to measure the effects of the agent on its target (surface receptor, intracellular kinase, etc.). This presentation will summarize the resources available for Phase 1 trials and provide examples of recent Phase 1 studies at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA).
The treatment of patients with advanced melanoma has changed dramatically in the last three years with the FDA approval of the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab and the approval of vemurafenib, a drug that blocks signaling by mutated B-type Raf kinase (BRAF). This presentation will review the current approach to genetic analysis of melanoma and the use of this information to guide therapy. Participants will learn about next-generation immunotherapeutics (including immunopotentiating antibodies and therapy with activated T cells) and molecularly targeted therapies.

2:30: p.m.

Break

2:50 p.m.

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Liver and Pancreatic Tumors, Shilpen Patel, MD, FACRO
Patients with tumors and other life-threatening conditions are benefiting from the steady evolution of radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Radiosurgery with fast-dose-delivery technology can dramatically reduce the time it takes to complete treatments. This presentation will describe stereotactic body radiation and how it is used to treat liver and pancreatic tumors.

3:50 p.m.

Current Perspectives in Thoracic Surgery, Douglas E. Wood, MD
Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the United States, resulting in more mortality than breast, colon, and prostate cancers combined. Though screening has never been supported for lung cancer in the past, new results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) support low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for a select high-risk population. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for early-stage lung cancer and often a key part of multimodality therapy for locally advanced cancer. Advances in surgical technique have allowed resection for tumors previously considered unresectable, as well as decreasing surgical risk for patients previously deemed inoperable. Strong evidence now supports the value of thoracic surgical specialization in decreasing perioperative morbidity, mortality, and cost, as well as improving long-term cancer outcomes. This session will review the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer and review surgical treatment options.

4:50 p.m.

Adjourn

5:30–8:00 p.m.

Get-Acquainted Reception and Facility Tours
Please join us for a reception at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Campus (FHCRC). Enjoy complimentary drinks and hors d’oeuvres as you visit with your colleagues from the SCCA, FHCRC and University of Washington School of Medicine, as well as get acquainted with other conference participants. A one-hour tour of the SCCA and the FHCRC campus will be available, starting at 6 p.m. There is limited space for the tour; registration is required. More information.

TUESDAY—OCTOBER 16

7:00 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks, Paul V. O'Donnell, MD, PhD, FACP

8:15 a.m.

Hot Topics in Transplantation, Paul V. O'Donnell, MD, PhD, FACP, and K. Scott Baker, MD, MS
Major changes have occurred over the last decade in the field of stem cell transplantation. Stem cell sources have changed from bone marrow to peripheral blood for most disease indications in autologous transplantation. New technology, such as reduced-intensity conditioning, limits early toxicity and allows allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients above the previous age limit. This presentation will address the changes in stem cell transplantation and review how this has impacted treatment today.

9:00 a.m.

Optimal Blood/Marrow Donor Selection, Ann E. Woolfrey, MD
The goal of selecting a stem cell donor is to provide the best match between the donor and the patient (host). There are multiple options available in selecting a donor and stem cell source for allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation (BMT). The clinical problem, overall health of the donor and recipient, infectious history, and other factors are important in deciding what type of donor is selected. This presentation will discuss how the selection of a donor is a critical element contributing to the success of a BMT.

10:00 a.m.

Break

10:20 a.m.

Genetic Counseling, Testing and Family History: A Genetic Counselor’s Perspective From the Trenches, Robin L. Bennett, MS, CGC, DSc (Hon)
Every day, researchers are learning more about the genetics of common diseases and how those diseases run in families. If you have an inherited disease in your family, a genetic counseling session can help you understand your personal risk or the risk for other family members. It can also help you learn what testing, surveillance, prevention strategies, or research trials may be right for your situation. This presentation will outline how genetic counselors work as part of a health care team in conjunction with specially trained doctors, social workers, nurses, medical geneticists, or other specialists to help families make informed decisions about their health.

11:05 a.m.

Pathology and Precision Medicine, Thomas J. Montine, MD, PhD
Precision medicine uses molecular profiling to create diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies tailored to the patient. Its success depends on establishing frameworks for regulating, compiling and interpreting key information. If this sounds like personalized medicine, it is—but more so. This presentation will discuss how to integrate clinical information with physiological, biochemical, and molecular laboratory studies to help define individual patterns of disease and potentially lead to better individual treatment.

12:05 p.m.

Lunch (provided)

1:05 p.m.

An Update on Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP): A New Treatment Paradigm, Terry B. Gernsheimer, MD
Treatment algorithms for ITP have not changed for the last decade, yet recent developments in treatment have created a paradigm shift in the management and understanding of this disease. This presentation will provide the latest information on the new thinking of the pathology of ITP, its impact on the management of ITP, and the integration of novel agents into therapeutic strategies.

2:05 p.m.

Break

2:25 p.m.

Lymphoma, David G. Maloney, MD, PhD
Both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation are viable treatment alternatives for the non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The decision as to which treatment to pursue is individualized based on the type of lymphoma, the stage of the disease and the general health of the patient. This presentation will discuss the treatment options that are available for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and address the prognostic indicators that influence outcomes.

2:55 p.m.

Post Stem Cell Transplant, Paul V. O'Donnell, MD, PhD, FACP
Historically, the best results of allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation have occurred with an HLA-identical-sibling donor, but for patients who have not found a matching donor, alternative donor methods should be considered. These include two leading therapies, unrelated cord blood transplant or halploidentical transplant. This presentation will discuss how the selection of optimal alternative graft sources, mismatched unrelated donor, umbilical cord blood, or haploidentical transplant are determined, and the overall and long-term response rates to these treatment methods.

3:25 p.m.

Surgical Oncology, David R. Byrd, MD, FACS
When metastatic disease is limited to an organ-specific site, an important consideration is whether the disease is resectable at the time of initial diagnosis or whether it is initially deemed to be unresectable but may become resectable with the up-front use of chemotherapy. With the integration of chemotherapy and surgical resection, overall five-year survival rates on the order of 30–40 percent can now be achieved. This presentation will explore the importance of a multidisciplinary, team-based approach and the role of surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, and other health care professionals in the treatment of cancer.

3:55 p.m.

Hybrid Imaging: A New Era for Imaging Cancer Patients, Hubert Vesselle, MD, PhD
New hybrid imaging scanners combine either positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with traditional computed tomography (CT). The resulting hybrid scanners (PET/CT, SPECT/CT) allow both functional and anatomic imaging with great synergy for diagnosis of cancer and evaluation of tumor response to therapy.

4:45 p.m.

Adjourn

Note: OptumHealth Education reserves the right to make any necessary changes to this program. Efforts will be made to keep presentations as scheduled. However, unforeseen circumstances may result in the substitution of faculty or content.
Last Updated: 10/02/12

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